Friday, 27 September 2013

video reviews

I read this discussion thread at BGG about favourite boardgame reviewers, and was a little saddened to find that we are already a TV generation. When the original poster asked the question, it was meant for both video and text reviews. When others replied, it seems that most people watch video reviews and nowhere near as many read text reviews. I realise I'm old school, in preferring text reviews. I was surprised that I might be in a small minority, and probably a shrinking one too.

I prefer text reviews because they don't dictate the pace; I do. I can skim, I can skip sections, I can easily jump ahead to read the conclusion before I decide whether I want to read the rest of the article.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Although I do watch the excellent Dice Tower reviews for some games, I generally prefer reading reviews for exactly the reasons you stated.

thew said...

I'm with you. I generally prefer text reviews although there are a few video review sites that aren't as painful to watch as others.

DiStefano said...

I do keep track of your blog since i discovered it. So please continue with the good work!

Mats Lintonsson said...

I prefer text reviews! So call me old school too! ;-)

Hiew Chok Sien 邱卓成 said...

If I remember correctly well-known game designer Bruno Faidutti is with us too. :-)

Tim Kreuz said...

Also prefer the text. I need reviews to help me find the kinds of games I'll like. But part of the fun of getting a game is discovering it on your own. These 10-20 minute video reviews give too much away. I'll find myself forwarding to the end to get the reviewer's final impressions...

Hiew Chok Sien 邱卓成 said...

Indeed if a video review (or even a text review) talks too much about strategy and tactics, then it is spoiling the fun for people who watch it. I seldom read strategy articles, because I want to discover the strategies myself.

One good thing about video reviews though is by showing some example moves, or demonstrating a round of gameplay, they can help you get a good understanding of how the game works and whether you'll like it. Seeing the physical components in action can be helpful when you're trying to understand some of the more complex games like Die Macher.